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Monthly Archives: October, 2012

31

October

Panthers-Redskins Preview (The Associated Press)

While dual-threat quarterbacks Cam Newton and Robert Griffin III are two of the most exciting players in football, their impressive skill sets haven't translated into many wins for their respective last-place teams.
31

October

Pierre Garcon: (Foot) Likely Won’t Return Before Week 10 Bye (Rotowire.com)

Update: Garcon (foot) did not practice Wednesday, the Redskins' official Twitter page reports.
31

October

RB Williams trying to take demotion in stride (The Associated Press)

CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) -- Panthers running back DeAngelo Williams is in the second year of the five-year, $43.5 million contract yet his future in Carolina has never been more uncertain.
31

October

Jordy Nelson, Ryan Tannehill headline Week 9′s initial injury reports (Shutdown Corner)

Week 9 of the NFL's 2012 regular season is upon us. Here's a spin around the league's injury situations we'll be monitoring over the next few days. Baltimore Ravens head coach John Harbaugh responded to their $20,000 fine from the National Football League by saying that the will list all injuries in the future. Harbaugh did not disappoint on Wednesday,  listing 15 players on their injury report, 11 of whom had "full participation". Included in that group was safety Ed Reed, whose admission that he had a shoulder injury prompted the league to look into the matter in the first place. Reed was one of the full participants, designated with shoulder and chest injuries. Defensive tackle Haloti Ngata was limited by a shoulder injury, but should play against the Cleveland Browns on Sunday. Browns defensive tackle Ahtyba Rubin (calf) and cornerback Dimitri Patterson (ankle) did not practice, but the defense will get a boost this week as 2011 first round pick Phil Taylor is expected to make his 2012 debut on Sunday. Taylor has not yet been moved from the PUP list to the active roster, therefore he's not on the practice participation report. Green Bay Packers wide receiver Jordy Nelson (hamstring) did not practice on Wednesday and won't practice on Thursday. If Nelson's rehabilitation progresses, he could practice and Friday and play against the Arizona Cardinals on Sunday. Nelson was a game-time decision in Week 8, but was ruled out 90 minutes before the Packers' 24-15 win over the Jacksonville Jaguars. Cardinals quarterback Kevin Kolb (ribs) and guard Adam Snyder (quadriceps) did not practice on Wednesday. Four Cardinals, including safety Kerry Rhodes (back), were limited. Atlanta Falcons outside linebacker Sean Weatherspoon did not practice on Wednesday due to a sprained right ankle. Weatherspoon leads the Falcons with 52 tackles, is second on the club with three sacks and hadn't missed a snap on the season prior to his injury, which required him to be carted off the field for precautionary purposes. Whether or not Weatherspoon plays this Sunday against the Dallas Cowboys will be determined on Thursday. Wide receiver Dez Bryant (hip) was among eight Cowboys to miss practice on Wednesday. That list also included defensive end Jason Hatcher (shin), running back DeMarco Murray (foot) and linebacker Dan Connor. Bryant and Hatcher are expected to play on Sunday, while Murray and Connor will likely miss the Falcons game. Miami Dolphins first round quarterback Ryan Tannehill (knee) was limited on Wednesday, but hopes to play against Andrew Luck and the Indianapolis Colts on Sunday. "Just taking it one day at a time," Tannehill said via Barry Jackson of the Miami Herald. "I want to play obviously. I'm going to do everything I can to be ready, and hopefully that's the case. I'm doing everything I can — icing it multiple times a day…You want to see where you are, if you get your range of motion back, if the pain is tolerable, (if) you're able to take your drop backs and step into throws."
31

October

Steve Spurrier thinks that Alabama could compete with NFL teams, and here’s why he’s wrong (Shutdown Corner)

Before we get into this particular topic, let's make one thing clear. While Nick Saban was an atomic nightmare as an NFL coach for the Miami Dolphins in 2005 and 2006, and remains a general pain in the butt as a media presence, there's no doubt that the man knows how to coach and recruit at the big-time college level. Saban's 2011 Alabama team gave eight legitimate players to the NFL, and the fact that he's right back on top with personnel losses that would cripple a lot of programs proves that Saban is where he needs to be. [ Pat Forde: Alabama coach Nick Saban is, indeed, a curmudgeon ] And that's why a comment made on Wednesday by former Washington Redskins and current South Carolina head coach Steve Spurrier is pretty darned ridiculous. "Alabama, gosh, they look like they could beat a couple of those NFL teams that I've watched on Sundays," Spurrier said on Wednesday's Dan Patrick Show ( H/T to CBS' Mike Freeman ). "I think a lot of the oddsmakers out there, that usually know what's going on, I'd guess Alabama would be favored by a little bit." Well, not really. Alabama might have more talent year to year than any other college team we've ever seen, but to place the NCAA on the same talent plane as the NFL is truly goofy. Most programs produce a handful of draftable players at their very best, and the large majority of college stars will be be pro washouts even after they enjoy the benefits of NFL training and conditioning programs. Spurrier should know better. Like Saban, he managed to survive two years as an NFL head coach (2002 and 2003 with the Redskins), and like Saban, he couldn't wait to turn tail and head back to the college ranks when it was made clear that he was out of his depth. [ Related: Steve Spurrier's classless comments stain tribute to Marcus Lattimore ] Any sort of matchup between Alabama and an NFL team? Heck, let's give Spurrier the benefit of the doubt and assemble a hypothetical group of big-time all-stars to face any NFL squad.  It would be men against boys, just as it was most of the time in the Chicago Charities College All-Star Game . This preseason contest between an all-star senior class and the NFL champions took place every year from 1934 through 1976 (except for 1974, when there was a players' strike), and both parties finally decided to disband the thing because the results were so one-sided. The college teams had an advantage in the early years, when their game was more glamorous and the NFL was still finding its way. But in the final 30 contests, the college teams won five games, and none after the 1963 squad upset the Green Bay Packers. You could argue that a group of senior college all-stars would fare better against a beacon of suckitude like this year's Kansas City Chiefs or the 2008 Detroit Lions (the only 0-16 team in NFL history), but the majority of those who have thought it through would seriously disagree. [ Video: Is Calvin 'Megatron' Johnson a mega bust for the Lions? ] Frank Schwab, who writes for Yahoo's outstanding Dr. Saturday blog and helps us on Sunday NFL coverage, put it very simply.