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Monthly Archives: January, 2014

31

January

Joe Gibbs: Dan Snyder will get Redskins to Super Bowl

Joe Gibbs not only believes that Dan Snyder made the right coaching hire in Jay Gruden, but that the Washington Redskins owner has what it takes to lead the team back to the promised land.
31

January

Most support Washington Redskins keeping name, says Goodell (Reuters)

By Steve Keating New York (Reuters) - More people, including native Americans, support the Washington Redskins keeping their controversial name, said National Football League commissioner Roger Goodell on Friday. Goodell took on the touchy subject during his pre-Super Bowl state of the league address and attempted to defuse the issue by claiming that the vast of majority of football fans, and the American public in general, have no problem with the Redskins name that generated protests last season at stadiums across the league. Eight out of 10 in the general American population would not like us to change the name." However, Oneida Indian Nation representative Ray Halbritter strongly disagreed with Goodell's assessment. "It is deeply troubling that with the Super Bowl happening on lands that were once home to native Americans, NFL commissioner Roger Goodell would use the event as a platform to insist that the dictionary-defined R-word racial slur against Native Americans is somehow a sign of honor," Halbritter in a statement.
31

January

Michael Strahan among 17 former NFL players up for Hall of Fame vote on Saturday (Shutdown Corner)

NEW YORK – Michael Strahan, here is the good news: Warren Sapp does not have a Pro Football Hall of Fame vote. Sapp recently expressed his belief that Strahan should not join him in the Hall of Fame. Both men have been enemies for years, and Sapp’s comments are not surprising. Nevertheless, Sapp’s opinions will not impact the 46-member selection committee that will decide this year’s inductees on Saturday. Strahan is one of 15 modern-era finalists, along with the two senior nominees (former Oakland/Los Angeles Raiders punter Ray Guy and Atlanta Falcons and Philadelphia Eagles defensive end Claude Humphrey) who will be considered for Hall of Fame induction when the committee meets in New York on Saturday. The meeting is annually held one day before the Super Bowl. A player must receive at least 80 percent of the vote to be inducted. Senior candidates and modern-era nominees are voted upon separately. A maximum of five modern-era finalists are voted into the Hall of Fame each year. Overall, a maximum of seven players (including senior candidates) can enter the Hall of Fame each year. The committee was originally presented with 126 nominees that were reduced to 25 semifinalists during the year-long process. The 15 modern-era finalists were announced early in January. Here are the 17 finalists who will be debated on Saturday. Post your picks in the comments section and see how many other NFL fans agree with you: Morten Andersen, kicker – 1982-1994 New Orleans Saints, 1995-2000, 2006-07 Atlanta Falcons, 2001 New York Giants, 2002-03 Kansas City Chiefs, 2004 Minnesota Vikings Jerome Bettis, running back – 1993-95 Los Angeles/St. Louis Rams, 1996-2005 Pittsburgh Steelers Derrick Brooks, linebacker – 1995-2008 Tampa Bay Buccaneers Tim Brown, wide receiver/kick returner/punt returner – 1988-2003 Los Angeles/ Oakland Raiders, 2004 Tampa Bay Buccaneers Edward DeBartolo, Jr., owner – 1977-2000 San Francisco 49ers Tony Dungy, coach – 1996-2001 Tampa Bay Buccaneers, 2002-08 Indianapolis Colts Kevin Greene, linebacker/defensive end – 1985-1992 Los Angeles Rams, 1993-95 Pittsburgh Steelers, 1996, 1998-99 Carolina Panthers, 1997 San Francisco 49ers * Ray Guy, punter – 1973-1986 Oakland/Los Angeles Raiders Charles Haley, defensive end/linebacker – 1986-1991, 1999 San Francisco 49ers, 1992-96 Dallas Cowboys Marvin Harrison, wide receiver – 1996-2008 Indianapolis Colts * Claude Humphrey, defensive end – 1968-1978 Atlanta Falcons, 1979-1981 Philadelphia Eagles Walter Jones, tackle – 1997-2008 Seattle Seahawks John Lynch, free safety – 1993-2003 Tampa Bay Buccaneers, 2004-07 Denver Broncos Andre Reed, wide receiver – 1985-1999 Buffalo Bills, 2000 Washington Redskins Will Shields, guard – 1993-2006 Kansas City Chiefs Michael Strahan, defensive end – 1993-2007 New York Giants Aeneas Williams, cornerback/safety – 1991-2000 Phoenix/Arizona Cardinals, 2001-04 St. Louis Rams * - senior committee nominee Want to watch the Big Game ads? Check them out here: - - - - - - - Anwar S Richardson is a writer for Shutdown Corner on Yahoo Sports. Have a tip? Email him at NFLAnwar@yahoo.com or follow him on Twitter! Follow @AnwarRichardson
31

January

NFL-Most support Washington Redskins keeping name, says Goodell (Reuters)

* Presents name "in way that has honored Native Americans" * Commissioner says he and NFL are listening * Oneida Indian Nation strongly disagrees (Adds Oneida Indian Nation response) By Steve Keating New York, Jan 31 (Reuters) - More people, including native Americans, support the Washington Redskins keeping their controversial name, said National Football League commissioner Roger Goodell on Friday. Goodell took on the touchy subject during his pre-Super Bowl state of the league address and attempted to defuse the issue by claiming that the vast of majority of football fans, and the American public in general, have no problem with the Redskins name that generated protests last season at stadiums across the league. "Let me remind you this is the name of a football team, a football team that has had that name for 80 years and has presented the name in a way that has honored Native Americans," said Goodell. Eight out of 10 in the general American population would not like us to change the name." However, Oneida Indian Nation representative Ray Halbritter strongly disagreed with Goodell's assessment.
31

January

Goodell accentuates the positive in address (The SportsXchange)

NEW YORK -- After a National Football League season in which the major issues involved the culture of the game both on and off the field, Commissioner Roger Goodell chose not to proactively introduce detailed discussion on the profound ramifications of safety concerns on game penalties or the impact of interpersonal turmoil within the Miami Dolphins on locker rooms throughout the league. Looking to accentuate the positive, Goodell opened his address Friday by lauding how New York and New Jersey have handled the run-up to Sunday's Super Bowl XVLIII at MetLife Stadium in East Rutherford, N.J., and that the game will feature the league's No. 1 offense in the Denver Broncos against the No. 1 defense in the Seattle Seahawks. The issue of safety concerns was first introduced in a question about Goodell's reaction to the decision by U.S. District Judge Anita B. Brody, who refused to give preliminary approval to the $765 million settlement on concussion litigation because of her concern that "not all retired NFL football players who ultimately receive a qualifying diagnosis, or their related claimants, will be paid."